Carbon dating earth

These conditions are met in two places on Earth; in the lithospheric mantle below relatively stable continental plates, and at the site of a meteorite strike.The conditions for diamond formation to happen in the lithospheric mantle occur at considerable depth corresponding to the requirements of temperature and pressure.Long residence in the cratonic lithosphere allows diamond crystals to grow larger.Through studies of carbon isotope ratios (similar to the methodology used in carbon dating, except with the stable isotopes C-12 and C-13), it has been shown that the carbon found in diamonds comes from both inorganic and organic sources.Small amounts of defects or impurities (about one per million of lattice atoms) color diamond blue (boron), yellow (nitrogen), brown (lattice defects), green (radiation exposure), purple, pink, orange or red.Diamond also has relatively high optical dispersion (ability to disperse light of different colors).

In contrast, eclogitic diamonds contain organic carbon from organic detritus that has been pushed down from the surface of the Earth's crust through subduction (see plate tectonics) before transforming into diamond.During eruption these pipes are open to the surface, resulting in open circulation; many xenoliths of surface rock and even wood and fossils are found in volcanic pipes.Diamond-bearing volcanic pipes are closely related to the oldest, coolest regions of continental crust (cratons).Diamonds are thought to have been first recognized and mined in India, where significant alluvial deposits of the stone could be found many centuries ago along the rivers Penner, Krishna and Godavari.Diamonds have been known in India for at least 3,000 years but most likely 6,000 years.

Search for carbon dating earth:

carbon dating earth-75

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One thought on “carbon dating earth”